Critical Thinking

Maddie the right time, making sure Claudius was

Maddie Blunier

Period 1 Mrs. Moore AP
Lit

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1/26/18

Hamlet Review Guide

1.     Foils

a.     Ophelia: Ophelia and her reactions following her father’s death
foils that of Hamlet’s. She becomes mad following Polonius’ murder, truly mad.

Hamlet fakes his insanity to distract Claudius from his plans to avenge his own
father’s death. Her heightened and real craziness makes his faux and mild case
pale in comparison. Ophelia babbles incoherently, like quote. Hamlet was more purposeful
in his madness quote.

b.    Laertes: Laertes and Hamlet both attempt to kill the men who killed
their fathers but go about it in very different ways. Laertes first thought was
to immediately seek out Hamlet and make him pay for accidentally murdering Polonius. quote. Hamlet, on the other hand, was more calculated in seeking
revenge, trying to find the right time, making sure Claudius was unable to seek
salvation, and acting mad to throw off any suspicions. quote. In addition, Laertes
forgives Hamlet for killing him and his father, knowing that he did it to
protect himself and honor his father. Hamlet would not do the same for
Claudius, who murdered out of cold blood and thirst for power. Quote.

c.     Claudius: Hamlet differs from Claudius in their sense of morals.

Hamlet has a more developed moral compass, always seeking to do right. He
wishes to murder Claudius only to get payback for King Hamlet’s death. quote. Claudius, in the
opposition, maliciously sought to usurp his brother’s power over Denmark by
killing him, and then marrying his wife, his own sister-in-law. Quote.

d.    Gertrude:

e.     Horatio:

f.      Fortinbras: Fortinbras and Hamlet start out the play in very
similar circumstances: wanting to seek revenge on those who killed their
fathers and their uncles have taken the throne. quote. Fortinbras is all that Hamlet wished he was, being quick to action and
having a strong sense of loyalty among his family. Hamlet was often frustrated
with himself and his plan to kill Claudius because of his lack of progress and
difficulty completing the task. quote. Hamlet also is missing
any allegiance to his living family. He cannot trust his mother, who married
her brother-in-law to not be lonely, or his uncle/stepfather, who murdered his
brother to have power over Denmark. Fortinbras has his uncle who he listens to, and can truly trust. 1.2, 27-31

2.     Themes and how characters contribute to the meaning

a.     Corruption/Disease: The corruption found in
the monarchy of Denmark acts as a decomposition of morals in politics and
power. The motif of nature and plants throughout the play also applies to the
government. Denmark seen as a power that is dying and failing.  (1.4.90) With a king that
has taken a seat at the throne due to violence and deceit has corruption rooted
so deep in the system that Claudius was able to continue to do whatever he
wished as king without anyone saying otherwise. He was willing to send the
people’s beloved Hamlet away to England without an explanation, just because it
was better for optics than throwing Hamlet in jail for Polonius’ murder. quote. Rotting is another
repeated idea, similar to disease. Corrupted people rot, are dead morally. quote. (5.1.173)

b.    Appearance vs. Reality:

c.     Revenge:

3.     Use of Humor

a.     Act 3, Scene 2 with players:

b.    Act 4, Scene 3 with Hamlet talking to Claudius after
Polonius’ death:

c.     Act 5, Scene 1 with gravediggers:

4.     Most crucial soliloquy:

5.    
Dramatic
Significance

a.    
Act 1, Scene 1:

b.   
Act 1, Scene 2
(beginning):

c.    
Act 3, Scene 1:

d.   
Act 3, Scene 3:

e.    
Act 5, Scene 1:

6.    
Discuss each
motif

a.    
“The Poisoned
Kingdom”:

b.   
“The Readiness
is All”:

c.    
“Emptiness is
Everywhere”:

7.    
Use of standard
dramatic/literary conventions

a.    
Imagery:

b.   
Soliloquies:

c.    
Parallels:

d.   
Asides:

e.    
Prose:

f.     
Irony:

8.    
Use of minor
characters in dramatic structure:

a.    
Rosencrantz and
Guildenstern: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern demonstrate even more
corruption put into place by Claudius’ rule. The two men who were
considered Hamlet’s oldest friends ended up betraying him. This betrayal hurts
Hamlet more than others, because they were his confidants and people he thought
he could trust. He knew that Claudius was corrupt and could deceive him in this
way but did not expect this from Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.

b.   
Osric:

c.    
Bernardo and
Marcellus:

d.   
The Priest:

e.    
Reynaldo:

f.     
Gravediggers/Clowns:

g.    
The Players:

h.   
The Ghost:

9.    
Defend or
Refute: Hamlet is truly mad:

10.  Character Analysis

a.    
Hamlet

                                
i.     Consistency in behavior:

                              
ii.     Words and actions spring from motivations that readers can
understand:

                             
iii.     Characters must be plausible and lifelike:

b.   
Claudius

                                
i.     Consistency in behavior:

                              
ii.     Words and actions spring from motivations that readers can
understand:

                             
iii.     Characters must be plausible and lifelike:

c.    
Gertrude:

                                
i.     Consistency in behavior:

                              
ii.     Words and actions spring from motivations that readers can
understand:

                             
iii.     Characters must be plausible and lifelike:

11.  Life lessons learned before Hamlet’s death:

 

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